Scam Warning Over Bogus Consumer Warning Site

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If you are looking for work-at-home opportunities --you may have already come across this deceptive marketing website dressed up as an investigative news site. A number of scam websites try to make themselves look legitimate through the use of bogus claims and website scripts that detect where visitors are browsing from and update portions of the site to mention their towns or cities. 

Unfortunately, some websites try to take things one step further and attempt to pass themselves off as sources of legitimate news in hopes of tricking those who are looking for legitimate opportunities.  It appears that The Consumer Warnings Weekly site at does exactly this; it masquerades as a consumer website that purports to separate the scams from real opportunities, all the while being disguised as an investigative news organization.

The Consumer Warnings Weekly site features information about fake consumer investigations which claim to reveal a work-at-home program that isn't a scam, and further claims that the one the site promotes has worked for people in the visitor's hometown.  Included are pictures of checks and a variety of comments which are most likely fake, along with "endorsements" from major news organizations such as CNN and MSNBC which are either taken out of context or are completely fake.  Pictures on the site are stock photos, taken from free photo libraries and other websites to try and give the site the look of a more professional operation.  Even the advertisements on the page are fake, directing users to other portions of the scam site when they think that they're clicking on an ad to learn how to avoid online scams.  To top it all off, the site even features a Facebook "Like" button so that unsuspecting visitors can share the scam with their friends and potentially draw in more victims.

Of course, if you scroll all the way down to the bottom of the website then all of this is revealed to you in fine print.  An "Important Consumer Disclosure" is located at the bottom of the page where many websites print their copyright information, obviously with the hope that it will be ignored by a number of visitors who routinely ignore similar text on other sites.  This disclosure reveals that the site is in no way affiliated with any news outlet and that the story presented is only loosely based on an actual story.  It goes on to reveal that both the comments and pictures are bogus and that the page receives compensation for any ad clicks or purchases made while on the site.  To quote the disclosure, "I understand this website is only illustrative of what might be achievable from using this/these products, and that the story depicted above is not to be taken literally."

A number of websites and products use fictionalized accounts of what their product may be like to avoid having to pay endorsement fees, but few of them attempt to pass themselves off as consumer news reviews.  The way that the site presents itself is intended to trick users into thinking that they've stumbled upon a legitimate opportunity when the disclosure itself states that results like those presented on the site may only occur with the top 1% of users of the program.

A number of savvy opportunity seekers will see through the site almost immediately because they've seen similar scams and know to avoid them.  Unfortunately, not everyone who's searching for a way to make money at home will be as experienced in avoiding work-at-home scams.  These are the people that the Consumer Warnings Weekly website is aimed at, those who will see supposed endorsements from major news networks and assume that the site is a legitimate opportunity instead of being nothing more than a scam.

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These days we cant trust anyone let along someone trying to SELL us a job. That's about what it turns out to be and they pretend to do it in such a way that makes consumers believe they are endorsed by respectable news agencies. It's not only hard to get a job lately but its hard to avoid being conned by jerks like this. Thank you Denise for raising a red-flag about this and other SCAMS. Do NOT give what little money you have managed to keep to yourself to anyone ever, without checking out their angle in Google or here! I will share your warnings and site with others.
Carson M.
Boston, MA

Add this to the questionable practices: someone representing this outfit appropriated my Twitter identity and tweeted a link to their site. It happened to other Twitter users too!/search/

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